Monthly Archives: October 2015

Onward We Go!

Keeping posts coming with the regularity that you, our valued readers, deserve can be quite difficult at times. In my defense (Rebecca), we’ve been on the road consistently for the last few weeks and have been drinking and relaxing on the Med with friends, which is quite taxing! As such, the rigors of travel haven’t provided me with the space and time needed to dictate my thoughts and hence this post will be a long one to get things up to date! But I have included an intermission!!

Boo Hoo I hear you say!! Swanning around Europe and can’t find the time to keep your extended family of followers in the loop! Fair comment – but Jen takes an awful lot of looking after! So here goes….

We were keen on spending some time travelling west through the Alps but first on the list was a stop at Berchtesgaden – the home of Hitler’s “Eagles Nest” and it afforded us a lovely drive into these incredible mountains.

Hitler’s 50th Birthday present was built in 3 years atop a mountain precipice with jaw dropping views across the Alps and, on a clear day, as far as Salzburg.

Eagles Nest

Eagles Nest

Left untouched by the Allied bombing campaign, the only real damage was inflicted by the troops liberating the country after the fall of the Nazi Regime. Chunks of a red marble fireplace installed in the building as a gift from megalomaniac Mussolini to his megalomaniac associate were popular souvenirs.

Mussolini"s Marble Fireplace

Mussolini”s Marble Fireplace

It’s a rather simple almost unimpressive structure not exuding the level of grandeur you might expect. Certainly an incredible feat of engineering, the building now finds itself purposed as a restaurant and although I’d expected more of a museum experience with the usual dissection of Nazi ideals, the structure has been given a new life beyond it’s dark reasons for existing which in many ways have saved it from being another example of tyranny.

The 80mtr tunnel to the Brass Elevator

The 80mtr tunnel to the Brass Elevator

Hitler"s Brass Elevator

Hitler”s Brass Elevator

Eagles Nest Restaurant

Eagles Nest Restaurant

Making west, it’s easy to find your jaw hurting a little as every road and km really provides splendid jaw dropping scenery.

Lovely Alpine Architecture

Lovely Alpine Architecture

Crossing into Italy, the Dolomites made an appearance on the GPS screen and I expected to see a continuation of the same type of mountain topography as that throughout Austria. Singularly unique, the Dolomites certainly have their very own character – colours, formations and appeal, placing themselves well apart from the Alps in character almost as if they want to be different.

Dolomites Scenery

Dolomites Scenery

Dolomites Driving

Dolomites Driving

Dolomites Pass

Dolomites Pass

This whole region is as visually stunning as anywhere else that I’ve had the fortune to visit. An autumn visit also has it’s positives – great hiking trails and a lack of closed roads along with the missing tourists that would no doubt patronise this area during ski season.

The Stelvio Pass is a mandatory drive with its 48 hairpin turns up and 40 hairpin turns down depending on your direction of travel. You can share the drive with Ferrari’s and Porsche’s and every kind of motorbike sporting want-to-be Casey Stoners perched on them. Some of them may have actually been stoners given their lack of adherence to any form of road rules. They seem to feel a sense of entitlement when on these powerful machines and get angry at the fact they have to share the road! Following a heavy Nissan Patrol wasn’t what they had in mind when they plastered on their saddle cream and strapped on their leathers in anticipation of a record fast ascent to boast about over a pizza and beer later that day.

48 Switchbacks up...

48 Switchbacks up…

And 40 Switchbacks down

And 40 Switchbacks down

Beer and Pizza

Pizza and Beer!

Let’s also not forget the supercars that hammer up the straights only to find they need to take the hairpin corners slower than we do! When the hairpins are close together as with Stelvio, it would seem that “made in Japan” and a top speed of 140km an hour down hill with a tail wind is just as fast on hill climbs as all of those stallions!!

That Patrol is still behind me!!!!

That Patrol is still behind me!!!!

I found it all rather amusing really!

Out of Italy and through Saint Moritz in Switzerland, it was the first time we’d encountered a re-activated border checkpoint within the Eurozone. Later we discovered that most Schengen borders were now, once again, manned in an attempt to stem the Syrian Refugee flow, along with the sudden exodus of people from Kosovo, Montenegro, Macedonia and so on, in search of a slice of Germany’s economic generosity whilst Mrs. Merkel remains at the helm and in charge of the cheque book.

Back into Italy and a look at the famous Lake Como but unfortunately it rained incessantly all day. Views of the lake were still lovely but gloomy and with a distinct lack of visibility and complete loss of vibrancy.

Lake Como

Lake Como

The wet theme continued as we travelled via Lake Lugano, venturing back into Switzerland before once again entering Italy on our way to France. You’ll need a map to follow that lot!

Lugano, Switzerland

Lugano, Switzerland

Trippy Tunnel!!

Trippy Tunnel!!

 

Bormio, Italy

Bormio, Italy

Beautiful Bormio by night

Beautiful Bormio by night

Montiglio Monferrato

Montiglio Monferrato, Italy

San Lorenzo Church dating from the 12 century

San Lorenzo Church dating from the 12 century

Village Scenery enroute

Village Scenery enroute

A night spent in the French town of Sospel deserves a mention – a classic example of a French village, as the pictures will display. Nestled amongst large mountains and sporting beautiful scenery along with character loaded buildings hundreds of years old, it’s affordable and a real taste of village life in France, yet your only 20km from Monaco!

Sospel

Sospel

 

Historic Bridge in Sospel

Historic Bridge in Sospel

More Sospel

More Sospel

We’d had a date booked in for some time to meet up with friends from Perth who were staying near Saint Tropez as guests for a wedding.

So onward through Nice, as we thought it would be good to have a look at the area and see if any memories were jogged as we’d stayed there in 2005. In the end, it was worth the detour but the traffic was diabolical and slowed us down to a snails pace. We managed our rendezvous  though, after submitting to the use of French toll roads in order to pick up the pace.

Friends Mick and Sue met us as we entered the village of Cogolin and Sue’s brother Chris led us out of the town via small roads and tracks to the place he calls home with wife Julie.

One minute you’re in the hustle and bustle that is life on the Med and a mere 10 minutes later, it’s peace and quite amongst vineyards and cork trees interspersed with sporadic dwellings – such a contrast.

St Tropez - Home of the Beautiful People!!

St Tropez – Home of the Plastic People!!

St Tropez

St Tropez

St Tropez Boats v Buildings

St Tropez Boats v Buildings

With such a relaxing, peaceful location away from the hustle and bustle but with such convenient access to the sparkle and glitter of Saint Tropez and the beautiful haven of Port Grimaud, it was easy to see the appeal.

Market Day, Port Grimaud

Market Day, Port Grimaud

Ample supplies of beer and wine left over from Chris and Julie’s daughter’s wedding just days earlier, made our stay even more enjoyable! The stun juice flowed endlessly and it seemed a shame to let it go to waste!

Drinks with old and new friends!

Drinks with old and new friends!

With Chris displaying exemplary skills in both fire making and BBQ techniques combined with Julie’s continuous supply of tasty treats we left indebted to these great people and hope to see them again should our paths cross.

Chris's Swedish Candle?

Chris’s Swedish Candle?

Catching up With Mick and Sue was a great distraction from life on the road. So nice to meet up with friends from home and speak some Australian for a few days.

Intermission – Time to grab a coffee or go back to work!!

Pernes les Fontaines was the town in our sights now after an invitation arrived in our inbox from Philip and Bianca (whom we’d been so fortunate to spend time with in Germany) to join them for dinner. On offer was a restaurant with a highly regarded menu of quality produce, a waiting list for reservations and overnight camper van parking! “Would we be able to join them as a space could be made available for us?”

Well, we like our food and it can be a real challenge finding a venue that will live up to your expectations and budget when you have very limited language skills. Wow! It was worth the effort! Outstanding food along with emotive and full-bodied conversation, we’d had yet another sensational interlude with 2 of the most interesting people I’ve ever met. It was over all too quickly for my liking. The following morning with hopeful plans of future interludes in place, we departed in opposite directions.

Pont du Gard, Avignon, France

Pont du Gard, Avignon, France

Sommieres

Sommieres

Sommieres Architecture

Sommieres Architecture

Sommieres River

Sommieres River

A poignant reminder...

A poignant reminder…

Roman ruins and ancient villages rolling by, we found our way a few days later to Narbonne in the South of France. Back in Turkey, we’d met some avid travellers who had invited us to visit en-route to Morocco along with offering the use of their factory should we need to perform any maintenance. Not just a factory, but a 4×4 specialist camper building facility! Being on the same page as these guys made life very easy for me.

Globe Camper

Globe Camper

Mecca Engineering and Globe Camper combine to build custom camper units along with all of the upgrades to the 4×4 that you could ever require. Skander and Dave have one of those unique working relationships that just works, not to mention Skander’s wife Veronique TIG welding in the background whilst Dave’s wife Monica fits a Webasto heater and plumbs it up. 2 great couples combining to build high quality campers ready for Morocco’s High Atlas or anywhere else you’d like to venture sums these dynamos up.

Skander and Veronique at work

Skander and Veronique at work

From the moment we entered the factory it was like being with family! Nothing was too much trouble and work was instantly put on hold to provide us with what ever we needed.

First on the agenda were replacement tyres! At the end of this post there is a little more about the tyre situation for those who are interested.

With tyres ordered, I now had time to service the Patrol whilst Jen tinted the passenger’s side window! The replacement window that I’d fitted after it was shot with an air rifle in the UK wasn’t tinted and she was complaining of getting burnt – the little petal!

Over the next couple of days we ticked off numerous other little jobs that we hadn’t had the time or a suitable venue to sort out. It was incredibly nice having a fully functioning factory to perform such tasks as opposed to what had become the standard – a paddock or car park! I cannot over-emphasise how grateful we were to have unlimited use of their factory, equipment and knowledge.  Big THANKS guys!!!

Being treated to a lovely Tapas lunch in Narbonne was totally unexpected especially since we knew these guys were under pressure to get a camper delivered in a couple of days but still they made time to ensure our stay was outstanding.

We did eventually leave them to get back on with their lives but not before they’d made sure we had track files for the Pyrenees and Morocco and anything else we required had been taken care of. Cant’ thank them enough! Hopefully we can convince them to join us for a tour of WA sometime in the future.

Our friends at Globe Campers and Mecca Engineering

Our friends at Globe Campers and Mecca Engineering

With days slipping by it was into the Pyrenees via the unusual little country of Andorra with its tax-free cigarettes and alcohol along with much cheaper fuel. It is an odd little place full of fancy ski resorts and not overly appealing other than the standard mountain views that are always welcome. It does however have some great off road trails meandering thorough its countryside.

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Carcassone, France, enroute to Andorra

Andorra

Andorra

We managed to depart Andorra via a well-known trail aptly called the Smuggler’s Route due to the trafficking of tax-free goods over the mountains and into Spain. It must be fact, as after a long low range descent and now finding ourselves within Spain’s’ borders, we were stopped for a cursory check and questioning as to whether we were carrying any of those cheap Andorran products via the local Police! Another visit to the Pyrenees without the time pressure of a dwindling Schengen Visa would be welcome as without doubt these lovely mountains offer some great camping and off road driving.

Smuggler's Route Terrain

Smuggler’s Route Terrain

Great Pyrenees Scenery

Great Pyrenees Scenery

We pretty much hit the highway at this point and put in 1100km over the next 2 days. We did manage a few side detours and interesting visits along the way however, probably one of the most notable being Toledo.

Toledo, Spain

Toledo, Spain

Jen had visited previously and remembered it to be worth the effort! It all went a bit pear shaped as we decided that we would break our own rule and drive near to the centre rather than a long walk, as time was an issue.

Passing the maximum width 2m sign, I already knew I’d made a mistake. I’ve been caught before but it would seem I’m a slow learner. (PS. We are exactly 2 mtrs wide!)

Well about 20 minutes of extremely stressful navigation amongst throngs of goggle eyed tourists along cobbled very narrow lane ways ensued! Wing mirrors grazing buildings as you idle by and tourists gasping as you just miss historic brickwork in order to make ridiculously tight corners is a give away that you shouldn’t be there! I even had to park up for a while after it was all over to settle the nerves! But the town was pretty nice!!!

Anyway it’s all on the car camera so I’ll see how it looks and put it up for all to see and as a warning to others! PARK OUTSIDE the CENTRE and walk in rather than thinking it’ll be OK!

The Spanish countryside along the South East is rather dull and uninteresting with km after km of flat and uninteresting terrain reminiscent of central Queensland I thought. The odd visit to a village made the journey seem less rushed and broke the monotony of the highway.

Castles and windmills in Spain

Castles and windmills in Spain

Gibraltar appeared and we arranged our ferry tickets from an agent in Algeciras recommended by Dave from Globe Camper. Good thing too as it was much cheaper than the internet and others!! A quick stock up with shopping including a reasonable selection of alcoholic beverages and it was onto the ferry. We hit the North African coast at the port of Tanger Med.

Ferry to Morocco

Ferry to Morocco

Stay tuned for the next instalment!

Cheers – Justin.

Tyre Update for those interested.

We’ve had a few problems with the Cooper ST MAXX tyres as some of you may know but were hopeful of continuing on the current set through to the USA as Cooper Australia had indicated to me some time ago that they may be able to sort something out with Cooper Head Office in the USA for our onward journey – an offer of which I am very appreciative.

As such, with intermittent visits to tire shops for rebalancing as best they could and one tyre losing air via splitting around the bead I was left with only 1 reliable spare but I’d still persisted with the vision of stretching their lifespan a little longer.

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It had come to the point however that I felt the possibility of a blowout or other high-speed incident was likely with really bad splits developing around the beads and a lot of delamination between the white lettering and black rubber.

Delamination

Delamination

The prospect of thousands of kms of harsh terrain in Morocco made the decision for me – they had to come off.

I’ve had numerous sets of Cooper STT’s prior to this version and found them to be a thoroughly reliable tyre, albeit with a low km lifespan as expected from a mud profile tyre. The ST MAXX’s have now travelled an admirable 56000km with plenty of tread remaining and if it weren’t for the presence of these faults, would have met the task required of them and fulfilled their life expectancy.

Still plenty of tread

Still plenty of tread

Uneven wear

Uneven wear

Vertical splits on the sidewall and lateral splitting around the bead however, of which there are many reports on the Internet, would seem to be an issue with this version. Maybe they’ve sorted it out with newer models but I can only go on my own experience. With 2 complete failures and all the others indicating similar areas of concern, it was an easy decision.

Vertical Sidewall split replaced in Russia

Vertical Sidewall split replaced in Russia

 

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Reluctant to find myself in the same situation again, I replaced them with BFG Ko2’s, which are BFGoodrich’s latest offering and competitor to the Cooper ST MAXX. I’ll see how these go over the next months and hopefully report back with all positives.

New Boots!

New Boots!

Captains Log – Stardate August 2015

This one is from Jen!  Sorry for the slow updates – Internet can be tricky when you are moving through countries quite quickly and they all require a different SIM card!

Due to the much scorned Schengen Visa restrictions, Justin was not in possession of enough remaining days to allow us to visit Greece – a country that I’m sure would have been grateful for our tourist dollars!! Well done Schengen Masters!!!

So Bulgaria again, but this time we were armed with a waypoint from photographer Chris, who camped with us in Cappadocia, that became a must see after viewing his photos!

Buzludzha Monument is one of those communist hangovers that just beggars belief!

Starship Enterprise

Starship Enterprise

Built atop a peak of 1441mtrs at a cost in excess of 14,000,000 Bulgarian Lev, it was opened in 1981 and used as Bulgarian Communist Party Headquarters.  Clearly, and rather ironically, the architect must have had a thing for the Starship Enterprise, as the resemblance is striking!

Of course, when communism fell in the early ‘90s, the monument was abandoned for what it symbolised and fell into disrepair. Locals raided whatever lavish building materials could be salvaged and the government officially closed the site due to safety concerns.  Creative graffiti now adorns the structure but there is a crawl hole that with a bit of bodily contortion allows access.

The crawl hole

The crawl hole

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Inside is like a Pandora’s Box! Stepping over rubble, you climb the once marble paved staircase and enter the central amphitheatre whose circular walls are covered with the remains of a mosaic depiction of Communist history. The domed ceiling no longer prevents the elements from entering and the wind rattles the rusted rafters but a mosaic hammer and sickle still proudly looks down upon the decay.  The outer plaza has more mosaic depictions and panoramic views although the chill wind penetrates the now absent windows. The before and after photos are staggering!

Opening Day

Opening Day

Now...

Now…

Before...

Before…

After...

After…

Before...

Before…

After...

After…

Before...

Before…

After...

After…

Mosaics

Mosaics

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Not for the claustrophobic, acrophobic or scotophobic, our next challenge lay in climbing to the red star.  Navigating through construction littered corridors, an underground passage and a prised open steel door; we found the steps that led 65mtrs to the top.  Without torches we would have been in complete darkness as we ascended the extremely steep, rounded edge ladder stairs with questionable welding quality. Finally natural light penetrated the darkness, and we emerged onto the levels with the fractured glass red star.  In its heyday, this was illuminated at night but now only sheds tears down the exterior concrete.  Further up the ladders and out through a hatch, we were atop the tower.

Climbing the dodgy staircase/ladder

Climbing the dodgy staircase/ladder

Through the looking glass...

Through the looking glass…

Now just red tears...

Now just red tears…

Atop the tower

Atop the tower

Despite all the decay, this is without doubt one of the most incredible things I have seen.  If the “Trekkies” of the world were to unite for a busy bee, this could be an amazing Star Trek Convention venue.

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Bulgaria also provided a few other sights…

MiGS on sticks are popular in Bulgaria...

MiGS on sticks are popular…

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So are tanks!

So are tanks!

Rilski Monastery

Rilski Monastery

Croatia was ultimately our next destination, so we started to head through the former Yugoslav States.  Trying to identify things to see in Macedonia was interesting and what was even more interesting was trying to find them.  Google produced a few results on our path which led us to the stone town of Kuklica. Not the least bit as interesting as the description, driving around in circles to find it did provide us with a campsite for the night.  Another attempt to find an archaeological site proved pointless.

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Kuklica

Kuklica

The Republic of Kosovo deemed fit to not trust the European Green Card Insurance accepted by every other country in the region and insisted upon the purchase of a specific insurance policy at 15Euros for 2 weeks.  98 Kms and 1 ½ hours later we had transited Kosovo and entered Albania.

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Not sure where all the ball gowns are being used but there were certainly a lot of shops selling them!

Not sure where all the ball gowns are being used but there were certainly a lot of shops selling them!

Always looking for the interesting drive rather than the motorway led us to the SH5 route through the top of Albania. Well worth the effort with great mountain switchback scenery although this was not to be unique to Albania as we would soon discover.

Scenic SH5

Scenic SH5

Montenegro’s transit led us to the Ostrog Monastery, built into a sheer cliff face.  Switchback roads were beginning to be a quite common occurrence and I suppose the absence of such terrain at home makes this scenery all the more appealing.

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Ostrog Monastery

Ostrog Monastery

Bosnia also presented some amazing scenery as soon as we crossed the border and it was whilst stopping to take it in that we met Aussie cyclist Ken.  Not only was he from Australia but he had lived less than 5kms from us!

Aussie Ken

Aussie Ken

Bosnian Scenery

Bosnian Scenery

Bosnia was unique for us as it was the first country where we needed to consider the prospect of landmines when we were looking for a night’s camp.  Not straying too far from the well worn track was the best strategy but signs did remind us of the danger!

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MInes!!!

MInes!!!

Not far into Croatia and we were able to see the clear blue water and coastline the country is famous for.  The walled “old town” of Dubrovnik appeared as we rounded a bend and that is probably the best that it looked.  I say this because, once we eventually found parking and walked into the walled city, we discovered that there is little there that is not designed to withdraw cash from the tourist.  Justin made the analogy that we are just walking ATM’s!! The tourist numbers were overwhelming as we shuffled along the polished pedestrian streets that reflected and magnified the midday heat.  Souvenir shops, restaurants, every house with “rooms available” signs and “Game of Thrones” walking tours– it seems that UNESCO funds were used to rebuild historic Dubrovnik after the war into an upmarket tourist destination for the rich and trendy.  No denying that the buildings and city were very attractive but it was difficult to appreciate it amongst the overt commercialism.

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik

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Local Musicians

Local Musicians

The rich and trendy?

The rich and trendy?

What we could appreciate however, was the beautiful Adriatic Sea. Camped just north of Dubrovnik, we were lucky to relocate to a just vacated site with uninterrupted panoramic views over the sea and islands so a one night stop turned into three! It is also where we met fellow Australian Jarrah and his Canadian girlfriend Danni and shared a few drinks and a meal together admiring the sunset.  Croatia has strict rules against wild camping and although we would probably have got away with it, the threat of a 400Euro fine just wasn’t worth the bother.  A short walk down the hill led to a small local pebble beach with some of the most crystal clear blue water.  A daily swim was mandatory and there were even some small swim-through grottoes beneath the cliffs.  Nature wins every time!

The beautiful Adriatic

The beautiful Adriatic

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Not a bad Camp!

Not a bad Camp!

Perfect Sunset Viewing

Perfect Sunset Viewing

Jarrah - The Quintessential Aussie!

Jarrah – The Quintessential Aussie!

Loathe to leave, we headed north to the Peljesac Peninsula and the little town of Ston.  Complete with its own version of the Great Wall, it was an interesting stop before once again we aimed for a beachside camp!  Different from our previous camp, this beach had a white sand base and was only metres from our car!

Ston Traders

Ston Traders

The Great Wall of Ston

The Great Wall of Ston

IMG_2816Fortuitously, we ended up camped next to Nick and Ivanka from Brighton who, a few years previously, had completed the Pan American Drive from Alaska to Cape Horn.  Given this is our intent for next year, we had lots to discuss.  Pawing over maps with these guys is already on the agenda one evening once we return to the UK for winter!

Ivanka

Ivanka and  daughter

The war in Bosnia has led to most people having heard of Sarajevo and it and Mostar were our next destinations.  There is something quite sobering about seeing buildings with the obvious scars of a war that I can remember seeing on the news. Standing in places so recently war-torn but now recovered, stands in complete contrast to any life I could imagine.

War Damage

War Damage

Mostar, with its cobbled streets and rebuilt old bridge was lovely to walk around and the river clearly defines a line between Christianity and Islam.

Mostar

Mostar

Mostar's Stari Most (Old Bridge)

Mostar’s Stari Most (Old Bridge)

IMG_2860 IMG_2855The drive from Mostar passed through a spectacular river valley before arriving in Sarajevo and once again we were met with buildings with shrapnel damage and bullet holes.

The drive between Mostar and Sarajevo

The drive between Mostar and Sarajevo

Signs of War...

Signs of War…

The old and new

The old and new

IMG_2881Heading north, we were now aiming for Plitvice National Park back in Croatia but not before an overnight stopover at National Park Una in Bosnia.

Strbacki Falls

Strbacki Falls

Plitvice is way up there on the list of tourist destinations in Croatia and the numbers we saw there supported that!  Tourist hoards are usually enough to put us off but we persevered through the line to get tickets and I’m so glad we did.  The lakes and waterfalls in this park are surreal and good infrastructure connects them with lovely walking trails which serve to dissipate the crowds. Fortunately, the powers that be recognised the special nature of this place from early times and so it was preserved in its original state rather than being glitzed up with resorts, cafes and plunge pools!

Plitvice National Park

Plitvice National Park

Nice Walkways

Nice Walkways

Crystal Clear Water

Crystal Clear Water

IMG_3026 IMG_3036The Istrian Peninsula was our last stop in Croatia having drawn us in with the promise of superb cuisine and hill top villages.  We were not disappointed.  Hum, touted as the smallest town in the world, saw us trying Biska – a locally produced mistletoe liqueur – and various truffle related products as Istria is famous for its truffle production.

Hum

Hum – Smallest town in the world?

Hum Truffle Merchants

Hum Truffle and Biska Merchants

IMG_3069Of course, this led on to having to partake in some sort of truffle dish for dinner and just outside the small village of Vizinada was an amazing local restaurant “Jadruhi”.  I will preface this with the comment that any time I have ever had a truffle dish previously; it has only had small specs of actual truffle and mostly infused with truffle oil.  Not here. With white truffle having only just come into season, we were fortunate to be able to order both black truffle pasta and white! Each pasta dish was laden with inch diameter slivers of the gastronomic delight and we savoured every mouthful.  Soup entrée’s, crusty home baked bread, truffle pasta, a litre of house wine and complimentary petit fours and Biska to finish all for the extremely reasonable price of 44Euros!!! ($AUD70).

Tempting as it was to stay another night in order to partake in the delights of this restaurant yet again, we had other things to see and so re-entered the dreaded Schengen Zone by crossing into Slovenia.

With the clock running again, leisurely strolling about was less of an option and Slovenia was certainly a place that we could have spent a lot more time.  Ljubljana was a lovely small city and the landscape to the north-west of the country was just so beautiful and scattered with walking trails that beckoned to be explored.  Small mountain roads were stunningly picturesque and we started to get our first views of Alpine scenery.

Ljubljana in the rain

Ljubljana in the rain

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Check out the shoes

Check out the shoes

Ljubljana's Dragon

Ljubljana’s Dragon

Great Slovenian Scenery

Great Slovenian Scenery

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Captain Jen – Out